Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
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View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Geoff Regan Profile
2016-05-03 10:02 [p.2735]
I have the honour to lay upon the table the spring 2016 report of the Auditor General of Canada.
Pursuant to Standing Order 108(3)(g), this document is deemed to have been permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Public Accounts.
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2016-05-03 10:02 [p.2735]
Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to four petitions.
View Scott Simms Profile
Lib. (NL)
Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the second report of the Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans in relation to its study of the main estimates for the fiscal year 2016-17.
View Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet Profile
NDP (QC)
View Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet Profile
2016-05-03 10:03 [p.2735]
moved for leave to introduce Bill C-264, An Act to amend the Canadian Bill of Rights (right to housing).
She said: Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the member for Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River for seconding this bill. The bill would amend the Canadian Bill of Rights to include the right to proper housing for all at a reasonable cost and free of unreasonable barriers.
Having a roof over one's head is a basic necessity. People who live on the streets do not know where they will sleep that night, whether they will eat, or where to find shelter from the bitter cold. It is much harder for them to find work, and their lives are very precarious. This affects their physical and mental health.
In Canada, at least 235,000 people experience this every year. Canada has recognized the right to housing internationally. It must do so in its own federal laws as well.
View Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet Profile
NDP (QC)
View Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet Profile
2016-05-03 10:05 [p.2735]
moved for leave to introduce Bill C-265, An Act to ensure secure, adequate, accessible, and affordable housing for Canadians.
She said: Mr. Speaker, this time I would like to thank my colleague from North Island—Powell River, who is seconding this important bill.
The bills calls on the government to develop a national housing strategy. Canada is the only G8 country that does not have one.
The current government talks about a strategy, but the process to implement such a strategy is crucial. It is not enough to simply consult the provinces, territories, municipalities, aboriginal communities, and housing groups. It is too easy to consult them, but then completely ignore the recommendations that are not to the government's liking.
Instead, the government must work in partnership with all stakeholders to reach a satisfactory agreement that is flexible enough to meet the varied needs of our distinct regions.
View Robert Oliphant Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Robert Oliphant Profile
2016-05-03 10:07 [p.2736]
moved that Bill S-201, An Act to prohibit and prevent genetic discrimination, be read the first time.
He said: Mr. Speaker, it is a great honour to give first reading to Bill S-201, an act to prohibit and prevent genetic discrimination. I want to thank my hon. colleague, the member for Madawaska—Restigouche, for seconding this.
The bill would create a new genetic non-discrimination act that would prohibit all service providers from demanding genetic testing or requiring that a person disclose the results of past genetic testing. It also provides for a complaint procedure for federal employees facing disciplinary actions because of genetic testing, and adds genetic characteristics as a prohibited ground of discrimination under the Canadian Human Rights Act. The protections in the bill would enable Canadians to access medical advances in genetic testing without the fear of negative consequences or repercussions on them and their families. It would empower Canadians to have better health.
View Kennedy Stewart Profile
NDP (BC)
View Kennedy Stewart Profile
2016-05-03 10:08 [p.2736]
Mr. Speaker, I rise today to present an electronic petition calling on the federal government to establish an independent judicial inquiry into Canada's treatment of Afghan detainees since 2001. It was initiated by Craig Scott, former MP for Toronto—Danforth and professor at Osgoode Hall Law School, and is signed by over 700 Canadians. The petitioners want an investigation into the facts, the conduct, and decisions of Canadian officials, as well as a public report assessing whether Canada complied with international human rights law. In tabling this petition today, the government will now be required to provide a written response within 45 days. I know many Canadians are expecting that the government will take these concerns seriously.
View Harold Albrecht Profile
CPC (ON)
View Harold Albrecht Profile
2016-05-03 10:09 [p.2736]
Mr. Speaker, I have the honour of presenting two separate petitions today, one from the people in my riding and the surrounding area, and another from British Columbia; Sherbrooke, Quebec; St. Catharines, and other areas in the Niagara Peninsula. All of these petitioners call on the government to draft legislation that will include adequate safeguards for vulnerable Canadians, especially those with mental health challenges, clear conscience protection for health care workers and institutions, and the protection of children under age 18 from physician-assisted suicide.
View Tony Clement Profile
CPC (ON)
View Tony Clement Profile
2016-05-03 10:09 [p.2736]
Mr. Speaker, it is fitting that during Iran Accountability Week on the Hill, I rise in the House today to present a petition put forward by the Canadian Coalition Against Terror and signed by dozens of Canadians, who call for the Government of Canada to maintain a listing of the Islamic Republic of Iran as a state sponsor of terrorism, pursuant to section 6.1 of the State Immunity Act.
View Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet Profile
NDP (QC)
View Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet Profile
2016-05-03 10:10 [p.2736]
Mr. Speaker, you will not be surprised to learn that I have a petition on housing calling on the Government of Canada, in collaboration with the provinces, territories, municipalities, community partners, and other players to maintain and expand the right to housing and the federal investment in social housing. This would include renewing the funding for long-term agreements. Some agreements have already expired, and people are in need. I have hundreds of signatures of people calling on the government to pay special attention to this.
View David Sweet Profile
CPC (ON)
View David Sweet Profile
2016-05-03 10:10 [p.2736]
Mr. Speaker, I have two petitions. The first one is on the same note as my colleague from Parry Sound—Muskoka, where the petitioners call on the Government of Canada to maintain the listing of the Islamic Republic of Iran as a state supporter of terrorism, pursuant to section 6.1 of the State Immunity Act, for as long as the Iranian regime continues to sponsor terrorism.
View David Sweet Profile
CPC (ON)
View David Sweet Profile
2016-05-03 10:11 [p.2736]
Mr. Speaker, in the second petition, the petitioners call upon the House of Commons to pass legislation which would recognize preborn children as separate victims when they are injured or killed during the commission of an offence against their mothers, allowing two charges to be laid against the offender instead of just one.
View Mark Warawa Profile
CPC (BC)
View Mark Warawa Profile
2016-05-03 10:11 [p.2736]
Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to present a petition from constituents in Langley, British Columbia, who believe that the impaired driving laws in Canada are much too lenient and should be changed. They call on Parliament to change the charge of impaired driving causing death to vehicular manslaughter. They believe that a person who has been convicted should have a driving prohibition, and that there should be mandatory sentencing if the person causes death while driving impaired, with a minimum five-year sentence.
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
2016-05-03 10:12 [p.2737]
Mr. Speaker, the following questions will be answered today: Nos. 75 and 77.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)

Question No. 75--
Mr. Mark Strahl:
With regard to “A Special Report on Wild Atlantic Salmon in Eastern Canada” prepared by the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans’ Advisory Committee on Atlantic Salmon: (a) what scientific analyses were completed by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans on each of the 61 recommendations contained in the report; (b) which of the recommendations identified in (a) have been implemented in whole or in part; (c) of the recommendations identified in (b), what was the cost of implementation both on a one-time and ongoing basis; and (d) when are the remaining recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Atlantic Salmon, in whole or in part, expected to be implemented?
Response
Hon. Hunter Tootoo (Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, in response to (a), initial analysis of all recommendations has been undertaken by departmental scientists and other subject area experts to determine available scientific evidence, activities already under way, stakeholder views, as well as jurisdiction’ roles and responsibilities of various partners and provincial governments.
In response to (b), amore detailed analysis of the report is currently under way. Initial review indicates that, to a large extent, the recommendations reflect many of DFO’s current activities in support of salmon conservation. As such, many of them are either already being advanced or will be during 2016 and subsequently on an ongoing basis. Some notable highlights include the following: (a) review of the wild Atlantic salmon conservation policy in partnership with members of the Atlantic Salmon Advisory Committee. This review will address a number of key recommendations made within the report; (b) continuation of departmental efforts to press for reduced international harvesting through fora such as the North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization, NASCO, particularly for harvests off western Greenland; (c) continue to engage with France, St- Pierre-et-Miquelon, to reduce its catch and indicate Canada’s desire to see it accede to NASCO; (d) creation of collaborative venues to coordinate and work collaboratively with university researchers, non-governmental organizations, private researchers, in an effort to identify, prioritize and promote collaboration and information sharing on wild Atlantic salmon research; (e) engagement with provinces and first nations on recommendations related to their interests or jurisdictions; (f) explore the use of innovations in technologies and intelligence to improve and strengthen enforcement efforts; (g) use the precautionary approach framework and its various elements to determine harvest levels; (h) work with groups like the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, ICES, on scientific research on the composition of mixed stock fisheries and genetic estimates; and (i) continue to evaluate the annual and multi-year approaches to the management of stocks on a case-by-case and province-by-province basis through annual workshops and consultation processes.
In response to (c), the report of the Ministerial Advisory Committee on Atlantic Salmon and its recommendations generally align with Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s current program of work for wild Atlantic salmon conservation. As such, it is expected that many of the recommendations can be advanced incrementally, and over both the short and long terms, within existing departmental resources.
In response to (d), DFO will take actions to implement recommendations under its mandate, when such recommendations are supported by the best available science. In some cases, the department will develop and review options to determine the best path forward to implementing the recommendation. It is recognized that, in some cases, other departments, jurisdictions, and partners may have lead or supporting roles in implementations. For recommendations, such as those focusing on the food, social and ceremonial fishery, FSC, DFO will continue to work with aboriginal partners and indigenous groups, while ensuring that FSC access is not unduly compromised.

Question No. 77--
Hon. Gerry Ritz:
With regard to the Minister of International Trade and her negotiations with the United States on softwood lumber: (a) when did formal negotiations on a new Softwood Lumber Agreement commence; (b) how many negotiating sessions have been held to date; and (c) who were the participants of those negotiations in Canada, the United States or elsewhere?
Response
Hon. Chrystia Freeland (Minister of International Trade, Lib.):
Mr. Speaker, in response to (a), the softwood lumber agreement has been in focus since the Minister of International Trade assumed office on November 4, 2015.
Negotiations and discussions between officials from Global Affairs Canada and officials from the Office of the United States Trade Representative have taken place on a routine basis. The Minister of International Trade regularly raises this issue with her counterparts in the United States and, in conjunction with her parliamentary secretary, continues to consult widely with domestic stakeholders, including industry representatives and provincial governments, in order to ensure an outcome is achieved that will benefit all of Canada.
During the March 10, 2016, state visit to Washington, D.C., the Prime Minister and the U.S. President publicly expressed their interest in a long-term agreement. Both leaders tasked their ministers to intensively explore all options and report back in 100 days on the key features that would address the softwood lumber issue.
In response to (b), discussions include regular phone calls and in-person meetings. In addition to bilateral meetings held in Washington, D.C., the minister has also had bilateral meetings and discussed the issue with her U.S. counterparts while in Davos, Switzerland, and Nairobi, Kenya.
In response to (c), various staff and officials in the Ministry of International Trade have been involved in the file, including: the Minister of International Trade; Christine Hogan, deputy minister of international trade; Kirsten Hillman, acting assistant deputy minister, trade agreements and negotiations branch; Martin Moen, director general, North America and investment bureau; Aaron Fowler, director, softwood lumber division; Gilles Gauthier, minister, economic affairs, Embassy of Canada to the United States of America; Colin Bird, minister-counsellor, trade and economic policy, Embassy of Canada to the United States of America; Michael Owen, senior counsel and deputy director, investment and services law division; Alexander Monchez, senior trade policy officer, softwood lumber division; and Zachary Archambault, senior trade policy officer, softwood lumber division.
In processing parliamentary returns, the government applies the Privacy Act and the principles set out in the Access to Information Act, and certain information concerning the names of foreign delegates has been withheld on the grounds that the information constitutes personal information or would be injurious to the conduct of international affairs.
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