PARLIAMENT of CANADA
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CANADIAN SECURITY AND MILITARY PREPAREDNESS

The Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence

Chair: The Honourable Colin Kenny
Deputy Chair: The Honourable J. Michael Forrestall

February 2002


The Committee Makes the Following Recommendations

Defence

1.       The Committee recommends that to sustain the level of tasking required of them over the last eight years, the Canadian Forces need at least 75,000 trained effective personnel.

2.       The Committee accordingly recommends an immediate increase to the Department of National Defence baseline budget of $4 billion.

3.       The Committee therefore recommends future annual budget increases, which are realistic, purpose-driven and adjusted for inflation.

4.       The Committee believes that Defence Policy should flow from Foreign Policy and that a Foreign Policy review should precede a Defence review.


National Security

5.       The Committee recommends a full review of the fencing and entry/exit security systems currently in place at Canada’s significant ports to determine their adequacy. This review should also consider the introduction of national standards for port security systems.

6.       The Committee recommends the introduction of a compulsory background screening system at significant ports to identify from among those employees or candidates for employment, those persons who are identified by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service as posing a security risk.

7.       The Committee recommends that in Canada’s ports the Customs and Revenue Agency:

a. conduct sensitivity analysis to determine what level of examination of containers will provide effective security; and

b. receive the funding necessary to equip significant ports and major border crossings with X Ray machines and other appropriate technology to inspect high risk containers.

8.       The committee recommends that a public inquiry, under the Inquiries Act into significant ports be established as soon as possible, with a mandate that would include:

a.  a major review of overall security at the ports and the development of a national approach to recruiting, training,  and the retention of security personnel;

b.  examination of the degree of control that organized crime has over Canadian sea port operations, as  well as the relationship between such control and threats to national security;

c.  an assessment of the potential for the use of Canadian ports to further terrorism;

d.  a comprehensive review of the customs, policing and security resources, including the role of private security agencies,  which are required at ports;

e.  a review of the effectiveness of customs inspections of vessels and cargo arriving at Canadian ports; and

    f.   a review of hiring practices at Canadian ports.

9.       The Committee recommends the Flynn model of enhanced Port security with preferential access should be monitored closely and examined further.

10.     The Committee recommends that the issue of the security of Canada’s coastline be examined, and a plan developed to broaden and tighten its security.

11.     The Committee recommends for airports: 

     a.  that a nation-wide system of electronic identification (smart passes) be introduced to control the movement through high risk security areas;

     b.  that a review be conducted of the entry and exit control systems  that monitor the movement within secure areas of terminals and  airport perimeters; and

     c.  that more rigorous security and police checks be undertaken on all prospective pass recipients.

12.     The Committee recommends that equipment be installed at all airports designated by Transport Canada to ensure that all baggage and passengers are screened for weapons and explosives and that, as reliable equipment capable of detecting  the presence of chemical or biological or bacteriological agents becomes available, it also be installed.

13.     The Committee recommends that a federal agency be created that will be responsible for selection, training, and supervision of persons and systems responsible for passenger and baggage screening at airports, and that this agency report to the RCMP.

14.     The Committee recommends that the movement of mail and parcels at airports be reviewed to ensure adequate security inspection.

15.     The Committee recommends that:

a.  the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency ensure that all personnel on the primary inspection line are trained to the highest standard;

b.  the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency ensure that no customs officers work alone at posts.

16.     The Committee has not been persuaded that Customs Officers should be armed.

17.     The Committee recommends:

a. that the lengthy delay in processing of Citizenship and Immigration Canada applications by the Canadian Security and Intelligence Service is unacceptable and that sufficient resources should be allocated to deal with delays; and 

b. that CSIS should be instructed to upgrade its intelligence operations overseas.

18.     The Committee recommends that there be an examination to determine which, if any, additional government departments or agencies beside the Canadian Security Intelligence Service and the Communications Security Establishment require oversight bodies.

19.     Given the importance of National Security issues, and the need to have procedures and policies in place before incidents happen, the Committee recommends that a study be undertaken to develop a National Security Policy, which will examine the roles of all levels of government.


PART III

Proposed Order of Reference

That the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence be authorized to examine and report on the need for a national security policy for Canada. In particular, the Committee shall be authorized to examine:

a. the capability of the Department of National Defence to defend and protect the interests, people and territory of Canada and its ability to respond to or prevent a national emergency or attack;

b. the working relationships between the various agencies involved in intelligence gathering, and how they collect, coordinate, analyze and disseminate information and how these functions might be enhanced;

c. the mechanisms to review the performance and activities of the various agencies involved in intelligence gathering; and

d. the security of our borders;

That the Committee report to the Senate no later than June 30, 2003, and that the Committee retain all powers necessary to publicize the findings of the Committee until July 30, 2003; and

That the Committee be permitted, notwithstanding usual practices, to deposit any report with the Clerk of the Senate, if the Senate is not then sitting, and that the report be deemed to have been tabled in the Chamber.


APPENDIX I

MAJOR ISSUES IDENTIFIED BY THE COMMITTEE

MAJOR SECURITY AND DEFENCE ISSUES IDENTIFIED BY THE COMMITTEE

During its initial planning, the Committee identified a series of issues it wanted to address consistent with its order of reference from the Senate.  This list of issues guided the subsequent work of the Committee as it developed its program of activities including inviting witnesses to hearings in Ottawa, arranging meetings with individuals and groups in various parts of Canada and organizing fact-finding visits.  A record was kept of the issues discussed at each event as shown by the following matrix:

Defence

Issue

Date of Fact-finding Visit or Committee Hearing in Ottawa (No. of Printed Proceedings is indicated)

 

Developing a strategic vision for the 21st century   Many have argued that budget cutbacks and events have overtaken the White Paper of 1994.  A review of the White Paper could be turned into a study of the principles which should guide development of the Canadian Forces in the 21st Century.  What role will counter-terrorist operations play in the 21st century, and how well are the Canadian Forces organised, equipped and trained to undertake such operations? 

July 18, 2001 (No. 1)
October 15, 2001 (No.4)
December 3, 2001 (No. 8)

Review of Canada’s influence in the global arena.  What foreign and defence policies will best ensure and develop Canada’s future influence in the global arena and protect her vital interests? 

July 18, 2001 (No. 1)
October 15, 2001 (No. 4)
December 3, 2001 (No. 8)
January 28, 2002 (No. 10)

Review of Canadian Forces Health Services.  Even before the attacks on the United States there was a need to review the medical care and treatment of personnel returning from UN missions and the services available to their families.  Almost any level of participation in operations against the foreign bases of terrorists will intensify the pressure on medical and dental services and the problem of retaining qualified medical staff. 

Western trip (Nov 2001)
Eastern trip (Jan 2002)
July 18, 2001 (No. 1)

December 10, 2001 (No. 9)

Quality of life. To examine the current living standards of the junior ranks of the Canadian Forces and an evaluation of the effectiveness of the program to improve the quality of life for servicemen and women and their families.  The issue of violence in military families would be a critical component of the study 

Western trip (Nov 2001)
Eastern trip (Jan 2002)
July 18, 2001 (No.1)
December 3, 2001 (No. 8)
December 10, 2001 (No. 9)

 

Recruiting and retention.  Recruiting new personnel into all services and trades has become increasingly difficult in recent years as has the retention of specialists sought after by civilian employers.  What are the present and future personnel requirements of the Canadian Forces and what trades will have to be developed to support the Revolution in Military Affairs in the 21st Century?  What trades would participation in counter-terrorist operations require?  To what degree do the Canadian Forces intend to make the most of the present economic downturn to aggressively recruit new and highly skilled personnel?  What pay and benefit packages will help to encourage present skilled personnel to stay in the Canadian Forces? 

Montreal trip (Nov 2001)
Western trip (Nov 2001)
Eastern trip (Jan 2002)
July 18, 2001 (No. 1)
October 15, 2001 (No. 4)
December 3, 2001 (No. 8)
December 10, 2001 (No. 9)

 

Operations tempo- The tempo of operations refers to the total number of missions undertaken by the Canadian Forces at any one time.  These include fulfillment of treaty obligations, aid to the civil power, training and training exercises etc. as well as peacekeeping missions.  Already heavily burdened, perhaps over-burdened, the Canadian Forces have just been assigned a new mission – to assist the United States “war” against international terrorists. 

Montreal trip (Nov 2001)
Western trip (Nov 2001)
Eastern trip (Jan 2002)
July 18, 2001 (No. 1)
July 19, 2001 (No. 2)
October 1, 2001 (No. 3)
November 36, 2001 (No. 7)
December 3, 2001 (No. 8) 

The Reserves must provide the mobilization base for war.  They include: the Supplementary Reserve, composed of retired (but not over aged) regular and reserve force members; the Canadian Rangers (who operate in the near and far North); the Cadet Instructor Cadre; the Naval Reserve; the Communications Reserve; the Air Reserve; and, the Militia, or Land Force Reserve.  Although some progress has been made in restructuring the Land Force Reserves (Militia), they still lack a defined role in the Total Force concept, unlike the Naval Reserve, the Communications Reserve, etc. 

Montreal trip (Nov 2001)
Western trip (Nov 2001)
Eastern trip (Jan 2002)
July 18, 2001 (No. 1)
July 19, 2001 (No. 2)
October 15, 2001 (No. 4)
November 26, 2001 (No. 7)
December 3, 2001 (No. 8)
December 10, 2001 (No. 9)

 

Equipment, procurement and contracting out.  Some Canadian Forces equipment is at the end of its lifespan, but budget restrictions have delayed its replacement and reduced the quantity that will be replaced.  There have been accusations from within and without the Forces that the procurement process has become unduly distorted by political considerations.

Montreal trip (Nov 2001)
Western trip (Nov 2001)
Eastern trip (Jan 2002)
Washington trip (Feb 2002)
July 18, 2001 (No. 1)
October 15, 2001 (No. 4)
October 22, 2001 (No. 5)
December 3, 2001 (No. 8)
December 10, 2001 (No. 9) 


Security

Issue

Date of Fact-finding Visit or Committee Hearing in Ottawa (No. of Printed Proceedings is indicated)

 

Human resources and equipment: maintaining state of the art capacity.  Budget restrictions have compromised the ability of both the RCMP and the Security Intelligence Service to keep themselves at the forefront of technological change.  Many investigations are dropped or not pursued aggressively because there is a shortage of trained personnel.

October 1, 2001 (No. 3)
October 15, 2001 (No. 4)
October 22, 2001 (no. 5)
October 29, 2001 (No. 6)
January 29, 2002 (No. 11)


 

Access to encryption and cryptography equipment.  The relatively unrestricted sale of sophisticated encryption and cryptography equipment and programs threatens to eliminate an essential source of intelligence about the activities of spies, terrorists and criminals.  This has complicated and sometimes frustrated investigations and has led to heavy expenditures on the development of counter-measures. 

July 18, 2001 (No. 1)
July 19, 2001 (No. 2)
October 1, 2001 (No. 3)
October 15, 2001 (No. 4)

Threat of man-made environmental disasters.  A national catastrophe might be caused, whether accidentally or deliberately, by a foreign power or by terrorists.  The continuing collapse of the industrial infrastructure in the countries once part of the Soviet Union raises the spectre of another nuclear “accident” caused by the “rust out” of nuclear facilities, equipment and weapons.  Another wave of terror attacks in North America might involve the release of toxic bacteriological or chemical agents into the atmosphere. 

July 19, 2001 (No. 2)
October 1, 2001 (No. 3)
October 29, 2001 (No. 6)

 

Transnational and cyber crime.  Like legitimate enterprises, crime has become international and global in its scope and can make use of the most advanced technology.  This has profound implications for law enforcement and co-operation among police forces at the international level, and even for local policing.

July 18, 2001 (No. 1)
July 19, 2001 (No. 2)
October 1, 2001 (No. 3)
October 15, 2001 (No. 4)

 

 


Joint Issues 

Issue

Date of Fact-finding Visit or Committee Hearing in Ottawa (No. of Printed Proceedings is indicated)

 

Development of a National Security Policy.  At present Canada does not have a specific National Security Policy that would place defence policy, foreign policy and internal security in context and relate them to each other.  While the constitutional division of powers represents a challenge, the time may have come to develop and promote a national security policy that could be endorsed by all levels of government. 

October 1, 2001 (No. 3)
October 15, 2001 (No. 4)
October 29, 2001 (No. 6)
November 26, 2001 (No. 7)
December 3, 2001 (No. 8)
January 29, 2002 (No. 11)

 


 

Countering national threats, terrorism, asymmetric threats and cyber threats The Committee could investigate and evaluate the relative importance of the threats posed to Canada and its allies by: hostile foreign governments; asymmetric threats of governments and terrorist groups; and cyber terrorism – the attempt to compromise or bring down the information systems which are the foundation of modern economies.

Montreal trip (Nov 2001)
Western trip (Nov 2001)
Eastern trip (Jan 2002)
Washington trip (Feb 2002)
July 18, 2001 (No. 1)
July 19, 2001 (No. 2)
October 1, 2001 (No. 3)
October 22, 2001 (No. 5)
October 29, 2001 (No. 6)
November 26, 2001 (No. 7)
December 10, 2001 (No. 9)
January 28, 2002 (No. 10)
January 29, 2002 (No.11)
 

Inter-agency cooperation / shared jurisdictions In a federal system the difficulties of international and inter-agency co-operation can be compounded by the requirement of co-operation and co-ordination in shared jurisdictions.  The Committee could investigate how well the various federal security organizations co-operate with each other and co-ordinate their activities, and how well they co-operate on both the international level and the provincial/territorial level with similar agencies.

 

Montreal trip (Nov 2001)
Western trip (Nov 2001)
Eastern trip (Jan 2002)
Washington trip (Feb 2002)
July 18, 2001 (No. 1)
July 19, 2001 (No. 2)
October 1, 2001 (No. 3)
October 15, 2001 (No. 4)
October 22, 2001 (No. 5)
October 29, 2001 (No. 6)
November 26, 2001 (No. 7)
December 3, 2001 (No. 8)
December 10, 2001 (No. 9)
January 28, 2002 (No. 10)
January 29, 2002 (No. 11) 

 


International Issues

Issue

Date of Fact-finding Visit or Committee Hearing in Ottawa (No. of Printed Proceedings is indicated)

 

NORAD, the continuing importance of NORAD to North American air defence and to the security of Canadian and US air space; 

NATO enlargement to the east and the development of a distinct European Security and Defence Identity, in addition to the traditional North Atlantic focus, will alter the nature of the alliance and have an as yet undetermined impact on Canadian defence and security policy; 

NATO Interoperability or the need to ensure that the training and equipment of Canadian Forces personnel allows their full participation in NATO operations, is an ongoing concern that must be addressed; 

National Missile Defence, the United States’ plan to deploy a limited missile system to intercept and destroy incoming ballistic missiles, will have a profound effect on the future of Canadian-US military co-operation, particularly in NORAD, and on Canadian defence and foreign policy in general; 

Defence of North America Homeland defence is an important issue for both the United States and Canada; it is time to discuss potential expansion of the Basic Defence Plan between Canada and the US to include a Joint North American Defence Command based on the NORAD model 

Washington trip (Feb 2002)
July 18, 2001 (No. 1)
October 15, 2001 (No. 4)
December 3, 2001 (No. 8)
January 28, 2002 (No. 10)

 

Border issues - Canada’s ability to prevent the its territory from becoming a free haven for those wishing to enter the United States illegally or to smuggle contraband into the United States has been called into question as has its ability to control its air space and offshore waters.

 

Montreal trip (Nov 2001)
Western trip (Nov 2001)
Eastern trip (Jan 2002)
Washington trip (Feb 2002)
July 18, 2001 (No. 1)
July 19, 2001 (No. 2)
October 1, 2001 (No. 3)
October 29, 2001 (No. 6)
January 28, 2002 (No. 10)
January 29, 2002 (No. 11) 

The mandate of CSIS is basically limited to the collection of intelligence in Canada and it has a limited role and capacity to operate in foreign countries.  How has CSIS compensated for this restriction and has the restriction limited the ability of CSIS to give the government accurate and timely information about security threats?  If it is decided that Canadian vital interests could be promoted by collecting intelligence abroad, should this responsibility be given to CSIS or to a separate body? 

October 1, 2001 (No. 3)
October 22, 2001 (No. 5)
October 29, 2001 (No. 6)
January 28, 2002 (No. 10)
January 29, 2002 (No. 11)

 


APPENDIX II

LETTER FROM MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH, Toronto

 

Dr. Sheela V. Basrur
Medical Officer of Health

Community & Neighbourhood Services
Eric Gam,
Acting Commissioner

 

Public Health
277 Victoria Street
5th Floor
Toronto, Ontario M5B 1W2

Tel:   416-392-7402
Fax:  416-392-0713
 

Reply:  

January 29, 2002

Barbara Reynolds
Senate Clerk
Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence
Senate of Canada
Parliament Buildings
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0A4

Dear Ms. Reynolds:

Re:   Public Health Emergency Preparedness

As Medical Officer of Health for the City of Toronto, I wish to bring to the attention of the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence some of the issues faced by local public health officials in Canada’s largest city.

As you are aware, the response to an emergency of any magnitude begins locally.  Local first responders bear heavy responsibilities as a result of being first on the scene, serving as incident commanders, and being public spokespersons while under intense media scrutiny from the earliest moments onward.  Yet local first responders tend to be on the margins of federal emergency planning, which only takes place in concert with provinces and territories.  Similarly, local emergency plans are developed and tested without the regular inclusion of federal officials, resources or expertise.  As a consequence, our collective ability to prepare for a major emergency in Canada is significantly diminished.  Lack of integration between federal, provincial and local emergency preparedness is a crucial gap that must be addressed, especially in a large urban centre such as Toronto.

Emergency planning has been a provincially mandated responsibility of public health units in Ontario for many years under the Health Protection and Promotion Act and the Emergency Plans Act.  In general, we focus on the prevention and control of situations that could present a health hazard to the general public.  This is accomplished through an extensive network of relationships with other first responders, hospitals, long term care institutions, physicians, laboratories, and community-based health and social service organizations.

In environmental emergencies (including chemical, radiological and nuclear threats), our role is to protect food and water supplies, to assess health risks, and to provide advice to the public to prevent or reduce adverse health impacts.  Operationally, Public Health plays a supporting role to Police, Fire and Ambulance services as well as to the provincial Ministry of the Environment.

By contrast, Public Health is the lead agency for emergencies involving biological agents, as in the investigation and control of outbreaks and epidemics.  In these situations, we conduct disease surveillance among hospitals and laboratories, investigate and counsel cases and contacts, and implement disease control measures such as immunization.  Other first responders usually do not have direct operational responsibilities in these situations.

However, in emergencies involving biological terrorism – whether a series of defined threats or a potentially massive outbreak of unknown origin – Public Health’s lead role to investigate and control the spread of infectious disease can conflict with the operational responsibilities of other first responders.  Recent anthrax-related events have demonstrated a clear need for better co-ordination among local first responders, health service providers at all levels, and various provincial and federal departments in the following areas:

·   sharing plans, resources and intelligence;

·   scenario-based contingency planning;

·   tabletop exercises, training and drills;

·   inventory management, distribution and deployment;

·  criteria and procedures for threat / risk assessment and associated protective measures for workers and the general public.

Generic and scenario-specific protocols are needed that emphasize communication and response coordination across related services.  For example, on-scene investigation and collection of evidence by police services must occur in a manner that enables relevant information to be shared with public health authorities, and vice versa.  This would enable both services to benefit where appropriate from the information and intelligence that has been collected during their respective investigations.  The use of a common planning framework (such as the Incident Command System) would also greatly increase our collective efficiency during the preparation, response and recovery phases of an emergency.

The January 1999 Report of the Special Senate Committee on Security and Intelligence provides an interesting perspective on some of these gaps.  The section on Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Weapons Attacks (p. 47) lacks any reference to public health needs or organizations, and its use of the term “first responders” refers largely to police, fire and ambulance services (p. 48).  The Report’s recommendations pertaining to first responders do also apply to some public health needs, such as those which recommend that the federal government:

·  support the training of first responders across Canada to identify and respond appropriately to a nuclear, biological or chemical attack;

·  ensure that first responders receive the protective and diagnostic equipment they require to respond appropriately to such an attack;

·  establish a national inventory of equipment and other assets available throughout the country to respond to a nuclear, biological or chemical attack;

·  conduct regular joint training exercises among staff from the Department of National defence, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and first responders throughout the country; and

·  encourage the proliferation of training and equipping of first responders on the National Capital model or some enhanced version.

Unfortunately, from a local perspective it appears that these recommendations have only been partially implemented.  The National Capital First Responders Committee’s plans and policies have not been documented or disseminated in a manner that would enable other municipalities to learn from their experiences.  Despite recent federal and provincial budget announcements for enhanced emergency preparedness, first responders at the local municipal level do not yet have access to sufficient resources, training or in-kind support from any level of government to “ensure” they can respond appropriately to a nuclear, biological or chemical attack.  As well, information sharing across government levels and departments remains very limited.

Greater public health capacity from a national perspective also appears to be needed in areas that include:

·   real-time medical and hospital-based surveillance systems for the early detection of unusual disease patterns;

·   rapid epidemiologic investigation of biological or other incidents in order to assess the human impacts arising from a recognized health hazard and to identify and evaluate the effectiveness of risk reduction measures;

·   laboratory facilities (including containment procedures, reagents and training) for rapid analysis of suspicious packages and samples where high level biohazards are suspected;

·   stockpiles of vaccines, antimicrobials, personal protective equipment and related supplies;

·   regional deployment of the federal inventory of emergency supplies and equipment to support the implementation of contingency plans arising from foreseeable scenarios, e.g. through the development and testing of “push packs”, a concept already used successfully in the U.S.;

·   information and expertise on decontamination procedures, health risk assessments arising from chronic environmental exposures, and other aspects of consequence management;

·   critical incident stress management, risk communication and mental health support for first responders, other exposed individuals and the general public; and

·   review of current federal and provincial legislation to ensure that disease control measures requiring quarantine, the restricted movement of exposed individuals, and/or the designation of public or private buildings for isolation purposes can be undertaken quickly, effectively and with clear legal authority.

While the National Counter Terrorism Plan addresses lead agency roles at the national level as well as federal-provincial relationships, the plan fails to address adequately the role of first responders to terrorist incidents.  National security and emergency preparedness discussions in Canada appear to be dealt with largely through federal/provincial/territorial processes that have no local representatives.  A case in point is a recent national consultation by the federal Solicitor-General to identify needs and gaps in emergency preparedness.  The choice of representatives at these consultations was at the exclusive discretion of each province; Toronto Public Health was informed of this process only by chance and after the final report had been written.

In Canada, a municipal government may request additional assistance to respond in an emergency from their province and then, if needed, from the federal government.  During and between emergencies, the federal government plays a supporting role to provinces and has no direct access to a local municipality except through the respective province.  Reliance on standard federal-provincial arrangements to plan and prepare for emergencies has precluded the development of a national approach that is inclusive of local first responders, including Public Health.  The Canadian system of “bottom-up” response under provincial control stands in contrast to the United States, where emergency response is clearly a top down approach.  The U.S. government provides on site response in the aftermath of an incident as well as training and resources for local emergency preparedness in accordance with national standards.  Clearly a stronger federal role and local presence is required in Canada as well.

Cities hold strategic importance for the country as sites of critical infrastructure, as potential terrorist targets, and as major population centres.  Conversely, cities have the potential to be an invaluable resource to other levels of government and to smaller municipalities.  Strong local capacity to prevent, contain and reduce the impact of an emergency has a direct bearing on the responsibilities and resource implications that would otherwise accrue to the provincial and federal governments.  Major Canadian cities should be included as direct participants in federal emergency planning as a matter of national importance, as our inclusion can no longer be left solely to the discretion of provinces.

In summary, stronger federal support for local first responders, including Public Health, will assist governments at all levels to discharge their responsibilities more effectively and to reduce future costs to Canadians.  Promising efforts are being made by Health Canada and the federal Solicitor General in this regard and should be recognized and supported.  Nonetheless, jurisdictional sensitivities are a heavy obstacle to the proactive sharing of information and resources, even in the current environment of heightened political will among the major players to work co-operatively.  The needs of local first responders, as well as the knowledge and expertise that is resident among them, must receive stronger recognition, and measures to ensure their direct participation in future federal planning activities must be developed.

I hope that this information has been useful and will inform the Committee’s deliberations in a manner that helps to address our needs.  I look forward to your final report.

Yours truly,

Original signed by Dr. Basrur

Dr. Sheela V. Basrur
Medical Officer of Health

cc:     Scott Dudgeon, Executive Director, Toronto District Health Council


APPENDIX III

PEOPLE APPEARING BEFORE THE COMMITEE

Addy, Major General (ret’d) Clive
National Past Chairman
Federation of Military and United Services Institutes of Canada
Oct. 15/01

 

Alexander, Dr. Jane
Deputy Director
U.S. Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency
(DARPA)
Feb. 04/02

Allard, The Honorable Wayne
Ranking Member (Republican – Virginia)
U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee
Feb. 05/02

 

Allen, Mr. Jon
Director General, North America Bureau
Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
Jan. 28/02

Amos, Chief Warrant Officer Bruce
423 Maritime Helicopter Squadron
12 Wing Shearwater
Jan. 22-24/02

 

Andrash, Mr. P. (Duke)
Sergeant 481 
Vancouver Police Department
Nov. 18-22/01

Atkins, Chief Superintendent Ian
Criminal Operations Officer, H Division
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Jan. 22-24/02

 

Atkinson, Ms. Joan
Assistant Deputy Minister, Policy and Program
Development
Department of Citizenship and Immigration
Jan. 28/02

 

Badger, Captain Chris J.
Vice President, Operations
Vancouver Port Authority
Nov. 18-22/01

 

Barrett, Major Roger R.
Operational Officer, 2 RCR
CFB Gagetown
Jan. 22-24/02

Bartley, Mr. Alan
Director General, Policy Planning and Readiness, Office of Critical Infrastructure Protection and Emergency Preparedness
Department of National Defence
July 19/01

 

Bastien, Major-General Richard
Deputy Commander of Air
Assistant Chief of the Air Staff
Department of National Defence
Dec. 03/01

Bastien, Commander Yves
Formation Administration Officer
Maritime Forces Atlantic
Jan. 22-24/02

 

Begley, Inspector J.J. (Jim)
Federal Policing Service
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Nov. 18-22/01

Bell, Mr. Peter
Intelligence Analyst
Organized Crime Agency of British Columbia
Nov. 18-22/01

Belzile, Lieutenant-General (ret’d) Charles
Chairman
Conference of Defence Associations
Oct. 15/01

 

Bishop Jr., The Honorable Sanford D.
(Democrat – Georgia)
U.S. House Select Committee on Intelligence
Feb. 05/02

Black, Lieutenant Colonel Dean C.
Commanding Officer, 403 Squadron
CFB Gagetown
Jan. 22-24/02

 

Bland, Professor Douglas
Chair of Defence Management Program
School of Policy Studies
Queen’s University
Oct. 29/01 

Boisjoli, Lieutenant-Commmander André
Commanding Officer, HMCS Glace Bay
Maritime Forces Atlantic
Jan. 22-24/02

Bolton, Lieutenant Colonel Bruce D.
Commanding Officer
The Black Watch, Royal Highland Regiment of Canada
Nov. 5-6/01 

Bon, Mr. Daniel
Director General, Policy Planning, Assistant Deputy
Minister, Policy
Department of National Defence
July 18/01


Bradley, Corporal John
Imagery Technician
17 Wing Imaging and Associate Air Force Historian
17 Wing Winnipeg
Nov. 18-22/01 

Bramah, Mr. Brian
Regional Director,
Transport Canada
Nov. 18-22/01

Buck, Vice-Admiral Ron
Chief of the Maritime Staff
Department of National Defence
Dec. 03/01

Bullock, Ms. Margaret
Manager, Security Awareness, Policy and Regulatory
Corporate Security 
Air Canada
Nov. 18-22/01 

Burke, Mr. Sean
Research Associate, National Security Studies, Council on
Foreign Relations
Feb. 04/02 

Burke, Captain (N) Greg
Chief of Staff,  Maritime Forces Atlantic
Department of National Defence
Jan. 22-24/02

Calder, Mr. Kenneth
Assistant Deputy Minister, Policy
Department of National Defence
Nov. 26/01

Cameron, Colonel Scott
Director of Medical Policy on the staff of the Director
General Health Services (DGHS)
Department of National Defence
Dec. 10/01


 

Campbell, Lieutenant-General Lloyd
Commander of Air Command and Chief of the Air Staff
Department of National Defence
Dec. 03/01 

Castonguay, Staff Sergeant Charles
Unit Commander
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Nov. 5-6/01

Charette, Mr. Serge
National President
Customs Excise Union Douanes Accise (CEUDA)
Jan. 22-24/02

Chartrant, Lieutenant-Commander Yves
Acting Commanding Officer, HMCS Huron
Maritime Forces Pacific
Nov. 18-22/01 

Cirincione, Mr. Joseph
Senior Director, Non Proliferation Project
The Carnegie Foundation
Feb. 05/02

Clapham, Superintendent  Ward D.
Officer in Charge
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Nov. 18-22/01 

Coble, The Honorable Howard
Ranking Member (Republican, North Carolina)
U.S. House Judiciary Committee
Feb. 07/02

Conyers, Jr., The Honorable John
Ranking Member (Democrat – Michigan)
U.S. House Judiciary Committee
Feb. 07/02


Corcoran, Mr. James
Former Deputy Director, Operations
Canadian Security and Intelligence Service
Oct. 01/01 

Cormier, Captain Michael P.
Deputy Harbour Master
Vancouver Port Authority
Nov. 18-22/01

Côté, Mr. Bertin
Deputy Head of Mission
Canadian Embassy (Washington)
Feb. 04-07/02

Côté, Mr. Yvan
Investigator, Organized Crime Task Force
Montreal Urban Community Police Department
Nov. 05-06/01

 

Couture, Lieutenant-General Christian
Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources – Military)
Department of National Defence
Dec. 10/01 

Creamer, Mr. Dennis
Vice-President, Finance and Administration
Halifax Port Authority
Jan. 22-24/020

Crouch, Dr. Jack Dyer
Assistant Secretary of Defence, International Security
Policy
Office of the U.S. Secretary of Defence
Feb. 06/02 

D’Avignon, Mr. Michel
Director General, National Security, Policing and Security
Branch
Solicitor General Canada
July 19/01


Davies, Ms. Krysta M.
Intelligence Analyst Specialist
KPMG Investigation and Security Inc.
Oct. 01/01 

Davis, Chief Petty Officer First Class Kim
Formation Chief Petty Officer
Maritime Forces Pacific
Nov. 18-22/01

Dawe, Mr. Dick
Manager, Personnel Support Programmes
Maritime Forces Pacific
Nov. 18-22/01

 

De Riggi, Mr. Angelo
Intelligence Officer
Organized Crime Task Force - Royal Canadian Mounted
Police
Nov. 5-6/01

DeCuir, Brigadier-General Mike
Deputy Regional Commander
Canadian NORAD Region Headquarters
Nov. 18-22/01
 

Devlin, Mr. W.A. (Bill)
Manager, Hub Development
Vancouver International Airport
Air Canada
Nov. 18-22/01

Dickenson, Mr. Lawrence T.
Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet
Security and Intelligence
Privy Council Office
Oct. 29/01
 

Dietrich, Chief Warrant Officer Dan
Chief Warrant Officer
One Canadian Air Division
Nov. 18-22/01

Ditchfield, Mr. Peter
Deputy Chief Officer
Organized Crime Agency of British Columbia
Nov. 18-22/01 

Dowler, Chief Petty Officer First Class George
Maritime Forces Atlantic
Jan. 22-24/02

Doyle, Lieutenant Colonel Bert
Commanding Officer, 402 Squadron
17 Wing Winnipeg
Nov. 18-22/01

Droz, Superintendent Pierre
Criminal Operations
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Nov. 5-6/01

Duguay, Mr. Yves
Senior Director
Corporate Security Risk Management
Air Canada
Nov. 18-22/01

 

Dunn, Major General Michael
Vice Director, Strategic Plans and Policy
The Pentagon
Feb. 06/02

Enger, Inspector T.G. (Tonia)
Operations Officer
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Nov. 18-22/01

 

Evans, Ms. Daniela
Chief, Customs Border Services
Canada Customs and Revenue Agency
Nov. 18-22/01

Fadden, Mr. Richard
Deputy Clerk, Counsel and Security Intelligence
Coordinator
Privy Council Office
Jan. 29/02

Fagan, Mr. John
Director of Intelligence and Contraband, Atlantic Region
Canada Customs and Revenue Agency
Jan. 22-24/02

Falconer, Captain Vic
Formation Drug Education Coordinator, Formation Health
Services (Pacific)
Maritime Forces Pacific
Nov. 18-22/01

Falkenrath, Mr. Richard
Senior Director
U.S. Office of Homeland Security
Feb. 07/02


Ferguson, Mr. Brian
Assistant Deputy Minister, Veterans Services
Veterans Affairs Canada
Jan. 22-24/02
 

Flagel, Mr. Brian
Director, Airport Operations
Canada Customs and Revenue Agency
Nov. 18-22/01

Flynn, Commander Steven
U.S. Coast Guard and Senior Fellow
National Security Studies, Council on Foreign
Relations
Feb. 04/02
 

Forcier, Commodore Jean-Yves
Chief of Staff J3, Deputy Chief of the Defence Staff
Department of National Defence
July 18/01

Forgie, Mr. John
Enforcement Supervisor, Vancouver
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Nov. 18-22/01

 

Fraser, Rear-Admiral Jamie D.
Commander
Maritime Forces Pacific
Nov. 18-22/01

Fraser, Ms. Sheila
Auditor General of Canada
Office of the Auditor General of Canada
Dec. 10/01

Gauvin, Commodore Jacques J.
Acting Assistant Chief of the Maritime Staff
Department of National Defence
Dec. 03/01

Giasson, Mr. Daniel
Director of Operations, Security and Intelligence
Privy Council Office
Jan. 29/02

Gibbons, The Honorable Jim
Member (Republican – Nevada)
U.S. House Select Committee on Intelligence
Feb. 06/02

Gilbert, Chief Warrant Officer Daniel
Department of National Defence
Dec. 03/01

Goatbe, Mr. Greg
Director General, Program Strategy Directorate
Canada Customs and Revenue Agency
Jan. 28/02

 

Goss, The Honorable Porter
Chair (Republican - Florida)
U.S. House Select Committee on Intelligence
Feb. 06/02

 

Gotell, Chief Warrant Officer Peter
Operations
12 Wing Shearwater
Jan. 22-24/02

Goupil, Inspecteur Pierre
Commandant
Direction de la protection du territoire
Unité d’urgence, région ouest
Sûreté du Québec
Nov. 5-6/01

Grandy, Mr. Brian
Acting Regional Director, Atlantic Region
Canada Customs and Revenue Agency
Jan. 22-24/02

Guindon, Captain (N) Paul
Submarine Division
Maritime Forces Atlantic
Jan. 22-24/02

Haeck, Lieutenant Colonel Ken F.
Commandant of Artillery School IFT
CFB Gagetown
Jan. 22-24/02
 


Harlick, Mr. James
Assistant Deputy Minister, Office of Critical
Infrastructure Protection and Emergency Preparedness
Department of National Defence
July 19/01

Harrison, Captain (N) R.P. (Richard)
Assistant Chief of Staff, Operations
Maritime Forces Pacific
Nov. 18-22/01

Hatton, Commander Gary
Commanding Officer, HMCS Montreal
Maritime Forces Atlantic
Jan. 22-24/02

Hazelton, Lieutenant Colonel Spike C.M.
Commandant of Armour School C2 SIM
CFB Gagetown
Jan. 22-24/02
 

Hearn, Brigadier-General T.M.
Director General
Military Human Resources Policy and Planning
Department of National Defence
Dec. 10/01

Henault, General  Raymond R.
Chief of the Defence Staff
Department of National Defence
Dec. 03/01

Henneberry, Lieutenant-Commander, HMCS Nanaimo
Maritime Air Force Command Pacific
Nov. 18-22/01

 

Herbert, Mr. Ron
Director General, National Operations Division
Veterans Affairs Canada
Jan. 22-24/02

 

Hincke, Colonel Joe
Commanding Officer
12 Wing Shearwater
Jan. 22-24/02

Hines, Colonel Glynne
Director, Air Information Management, Chief of the
Air Staff
Department of National Defence
July 18/01

 

Hornbarger, Mr. Chris
Director
U.S. Office of Homeland Security
Feb. 07/02

Hunter, The Honorable Duncan
Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Military
Procurement (Republican – California)
U.S. House Armed Services Committee
Feb. 06/02

 

Inkster, Mr. Norman
President, KPMG Investigation and Security
Inc.
Former Commissioner, Royal Canadian
Mounted Police
Oct. 01/01
 

Issacs, Sergeant Tony
Search and Rescue Technician
Maritime Forces Atlantic
Jan. 22-24/02

Jackson, Ms. Gaynor
Manager, Military Family Support Centre
Maritime Forces Pacific
Nov. 18-22/01
 

Jeffery, Lieutenant General M.K.
Chief of the Land Staff
Department of National Defence
Dec. 03/01


 

Joncas, Chief Petty Officer First Class Serge
Maritime Command Chief Petty Officer
Department of National Defence
Dec. 03/01

 

Jurkowski, Brigadier General (ret’d) David
Former Chief of Staff, Joint Operations
Department of National Defence
Oct. 01/01

Kasurak, Mr. Peter
Principal
Office of the Auditor General of Canada
Dec. 10/01

 

Keane, Mr. John
Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Western
Hemisphere Affairs
U.S. Department of State
Feb. 06/02
 

Kee, Mr. Graham
Chief Security Officer
Vancouver Port Authority
Nov. 18-22/01

Kelly, Lieutenant Colonel W.J.
Force Planning and Program Coordination,
Vice Chief of the Defence Staff
Department of National Defence
July 18/01 
 

Kennedy, Mr. Paul
Senior Assistant Deputy Solicitor General
Solicitor General Canada
Jan. 28/02

 

Khokhar, Mr. Jamal
Minister-Counsellor (Congressional Affairs)
Canadian Embassy (Washington)
Feb. 04/02

Kiloh, Insp. D.W. (Doug)
Major Case Manager
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Nov. 18-22/01

Krause, Lieutenant Colonel Wayne
Commanding Officer, 423 Maritime Helicopter
Squadron
12 Wing Shearwater
Jan. 22-24/02
 

Kurzynski, Major Perry
Officer-in-charge, Search and Rescue
Operations Centre
Maritime Forces Atlantic
Jan. 22-24/02
 

LaFrance, Mr. Albert
Director, Northern New Brunswick District
Canada Customs and Revenue Agency
Jan. 22-24/02

Laing, Captain (Navy) Kevin
Director, Maritime Strategy, Chief of
Maritime Staff
Department of National Defence
July 18/01

 

Leblanc, Ms. Annie
Acting Director,
Technology and Lawful Access Division
Solicitor General Canada
July 19/01

Lenton, Assistant Commissioner William
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Jan. 28/02

 

Lerhe, Commodore E.J. (Eric)
Commander, Canadian Fleet Pacific
Maritime Forces Pacific
Nov. 18-22/01

Levy, Mr. Bruce
Director, U.S. Transboundary Division
Department of Foreign Affairs and
International Trade
Jan. 28/02
 

Loeppky, Deputy Commissioner Garry
Operations
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Oct. 22/01

Lucas, Major General Steve
Commander One Canadian Air Division /
Canadian NORAD Region Headquarters
Nov. 18-22/01
 

Lupien, Chief Petty Officer First Class R.M.
Canadian Forces Chief Warrant Officer
Department of National Defence
Dec. 03/01

 

Macdonald, Lieutenant-General
George
Vice Chief of the Defence Staff
Department of National Defence
Jan. 28/02

 

Mack, Rear Admiral Ian
Defence Attaché
Canadian Embassy (Washington)
Feb. 04/02

MacLeod, Colonel Barry W.
Commander 3 Area Support Group
CFB Gagetown
Jan. 22-24/02

 

Maher, Lieutenant Earl
4 ESR
CFB Gagetown
Jan. 21-24/02

Maisonneuve, Major-General J.O. Michel
Assistant Deputy Chief of Defence Staff
Department of National Defence
Oct. 22/01

 

Malec, Mr. George
Assistant Harbour master
Halifax Port Authority
Jan. 22-24/02

Mason, Mr. Dwight
Joint Chief of Staff, U.S. Chair, Permanent
Joint Board on Defence
The Pentagon
Feb. 06/02

Mason, Ms. Nancy
Director, Office of Canadian Affairs, Bureau of
Western Hemisphere Affairs
U.S. Department of State
Feb. 06/02
 

 

Mason, Lieutenant Colonel Dave
Commanding Officer, 12 Air Maintenance
Squadron
12 Wing Shearwater
Jan. 22-24/02
 

Massicotte, Ms Olga
Regional Director General/Atlantic
Veterans Affairs Canada
Jan. 22-24/02

Mattie, Chief Warrant Officer Fred
12 Air Maintenance Squadron
12 Wing Shearwater
Jan. 22-24/02

McIlhenny, Mr. Bill
Director for Canada and Mexico
U.S. National Security Council
Feb. 07/02

McKinnon, Chief David P.
Chief of Police
Halifax Regional Police Force
Jan. 22-24/02

McManus, Lieutenant-Colonel J.J. (John)
Commanding Officer, 443 (MH) Squadron
Maritime Air Force Command Pacific
Nov. 18-22/01
 

McNeil, Commodore Daniel
Director, Force Planning and Program
Coordination, Vice Chief of the Defence
Staff
Department of National Defence
July 18/01 
 

Mercer, Mr. Wayne
Acting First Vice-President, Nova Scotia District
BranchCustomes Excise Union Douanes Accise
(CEUDA)t de la Nouvelle-Écosse
Customs Excise Union Douanes Accise (CEUDA)
Jan. 22-24/02


Miller, Mr. Frank
Senior Director, President’s Adviser on
Military Matters
U.S. National Security Council
Feb. 07/02
 

Minto, Mr. Shahid
Assistant Auditor General
Office of the Auditor General of Canada
Dec. 10/01

Mitchell, Mr. Barry
Director, Nova Scotia District
Canada Customs and Revenue Agency
Jan. 22-24/02
 

Mitchell, Brigadier General Greg
Commander
Land Forces Atlantic Area
Jan. 22-24/02

Mogan, Mr. Darragh
Director General, Program and Service
Policy Division, Veterans Services
Veterans Affairs Canada
Jan. 22-24/02
 

Morris, Ms. Linda
Director, Public Affairs
Vancouver Port Authority
Nov. 18-22/01

Munger, Chief Warrant Officer JER
Office of Land Force Command
Department of National Defence
Dec. 03/01
 

Murphy, Captain (N) R.D. (Dan)
Deputy Commander, Canadian Fleet Pacific
Maritime Forces Pacific
Nov. 18-22/01


Murray, Ms. Anne C.
Vice President
Community and Environmental Affairs
Vancouver International Airport Authority
Nov. 18-22/01

Murray, Admiral (ret’d). Larry
Deputy Minister
Veterans Affairs Canada
Jan. 22-24/02

Narayan, Mr. Francis
Detector Dog Service
Canada Customs and Revenue Agency
Nov. 18-22/01

Neumann, Ms. Susanne M.
Compliance Verification Officer
Customs – Compliance Mgt. Division
Canada Customs and Revenue Agency
Nov. 18-22/01
 

Neville, Lieutenant-Colonel Shirley
Wing Administration Officer, Acting Wing
Commander, 17 Wing
17 Wing Winnipeg
Nov. 18-22/01
 

Newberry, Mr. Robert J.
Principal Director, Territorial Security
The Pentagon
Feb. 06/02

Newton, Captain John F.
Senior Staff Officer, Operations
Maritime Forces Atlantic
Jan. 22-24/02
 

Nymark, Ms. Christine
Associate Assistant Deputy Minister
Transport Canada
Jan. 28/02

O’Bright, Mr. Gary
Director General,
Operations,
Office of Critical Infrastructure Protection
and Emergency Preparedness
Department of National Defence
July 19/01

 

O’Hanlon, Mr.  Michael
Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Studies
The Brookings Institution
Feb. 05/02

O’Shea, Mr. Kevin
Director, U.S. General Relations Division
Department of Foreign Affairs and
International Trade
Jan. 28/02

Ortiz, The Honorable Solomon P.
Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Military
Readiness (Democrat – Texas)
U.S. House Armed Services Committee
Feb. 06/02

Paulson, Captain (N) Gary
Commanding Officer, HMCS Algonquin
Maritime Forces Pacific
Nov. 18-22/01

 

Payne, Captain (N) Richard
Commanding Officer, Fleet Mantenance Facility
Cape Scott
Maritime Forces Atlantic
Jan. 22-24/02

Pearson, Lieutenant Colonel Michael J.
Commandant of Infantry School SAT
CFB Gagetown
Jan. 22-24/02

Pellerin, Colonel (ret’d) Alain
Executive Director
Conference of Defence Associations
Oct. 15/01

Peters, Colonel William
Director, Land Strategic Planning, Chief of
the Land Staff
Department of National Defence
July 18/01

Pharand, M. Pierre
Director, Airport Security
Montréal Airports
Nov. 5-6/01

Pichette, Mr. Pierre-Paul
Assistant Director, 
Montreal Urban Community Police
Department
Nov. 5-6/01

Pigeon, Mr. Jean François
Acting Director, Security
Montreal Airports
Nov. 5-6/01

Pile, Captain (N) T.H.W. (Tyron)
Commander, Maritime Operations Group
Four
Maritime Forces Pacific
Nov. 18-22/01

Pilgrim, Superintendent J. Wayne
Officer in Charge,
National Security Investigations Branch,
Criminal Intelligence Directorate
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
July 19/01

Pitman, Mr. B.R. (Brian)
Sergeant, Waterfront Joint Forces
Operation, Vancouver
Royal Canadian. Mounted Police
Nov. 18-22/01

Preece, Captain (N) Christian
Maritime Forces Atlantic
Jan. 22-24/02

 

Primeau, M. Pierre
Investigator
Organized Crime Task Force – Royal
Canadian Mounted Police
Nov. 5-6/01
 

Proulx, Assistant Commissioner Richard
Criminal Intelligence Directorate
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Oct. 22/01

Reed, The Honorable Jack
Chair (Democrat – Rhode Island)
U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee
Feb. 05/02

Reid, Lieutenant Colonel Gord
Commandant, Canadian Forces Air Navigation
School (CFANS)
17 Wing Winnipeg
Nov. 18-22/01

Richmond, Mr. Craig
Vice President, Airport Operations
Vancouver International Airport
Nov. 18-22/01 

Rose, Mr. Frank
International Security Policy
The Pentagon
Feb. 06/02

Ross, Major-General H. Cameron
Director General, International Security
Policy
Department of National Defence
Jan. 28/02

Rumsfeld, The Honorable Donald
U.S. Secretary of defence
Feb. 06/02


Salesses, Lieutenant Colonel Bob
Logistics Directorate for Homeland Security
The Pentagon
Feb. 06/02

 

Samson, Brigadier-General
Director General - Intelligence
Department of National Defence
Oct. 22/01

Sensenbrenner, Jr., The Honorable F. James
Chair (Republican – Wisconsin
U.S. House Judiciary Committee
Feb. 07/02
 

Shapardanov, Mr. Chris
Counsellor, Political
Canadian Embassy (Washington)
 Feb. 04/02
 

Simmons, Mr. Robert
Deputy Director, Office of European
Security and Political Affairs, Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs
U.S. Department of State
Feb. 06/02
 

Sinclair, Ms. Jill
Director General, International Security Bureau
Department of Foreign Affairs and International
Trade
Jan. 28/02

Skelton, The Honorable Ike
Ranking Member (Democrat – Missouri)
U.S. House Armed Services Committee
Feb. 06/02
 

Slater, Ms. Scenery C.
District Program Officer
Metro Vancouver District
Canada Customs and Revenue Agency
Nov. 18-22/01


Starck, Mr. Richard
Senior Counsel
Federal Prosecution Service, Quebec
Regional Office
Department of Justice
Nov. 5-6/01
 

Stark, Lieutenant-Commander Gary
Commanding Officer, HMCS Whitehorse
Maritime Forces Pacific
Nov. 18-22/01

Stewart, Mr. James
Civilian Human Resources
Maritime Forces Atlantic
Jan. 22-24/02

St-Pierre, M. Jacquelin
Commanding Officer, Post 5
Montreal Urban Community Police Department
Nov. 5-6/01
 

Stump, The Honorable Bob
Chair (Republican – Arizona)
U.S. House Armed Services Committee
Feb. 06/02

Szczerbaniwicz, Lieutenant-Colonel Gary
Commanding Officer, 407 Squadron
Maritime Air Force Command Pacific
Nov. 18-22/01

 

Taylor, The Honorable Gene
Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Military
Procurement (Democrat – Mississippi)
U.S. House Armed Services Committee
Feb. 06/02

Taylor, Mr. Robert
Inspector,
Vancouver Police Department
Nov. 18-22/01

Theilmann, Mr. Mike
Acting Director,
Counter-Terrorism Division
Solicitor General Canada
July 19/01

 

Tulenko, Mr.  Timothy
Political-Military officer, Office of Canadian Affairs,
Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs
U.S. Department of State
Feb. 06/02

Verga, Mr. Peter F.
Special Assistant for Homeland Security
The Pentagon
Feb. 06/02

Wamback, Lieutenant-Commander Arthur
Commanding Officer, HMCS Windsor
Maritime Forces Atlantic
Jan. 22-24/02
 

Ward, Colonel Mike J.
Commander Combat Training Centre
CFB Gagetown
Jan. 22-24/02

Wark, Professor Wesley K.
Associate Professor in the Dept. of History
Munk Centre for International Studies
Trinity College
University of Toronto
Oct. 01/01
 

Warner, The Honorable John
Ranking Member (Republican – Virginia)
U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee
Feb. 05/02

 

Watts, Chief Warrant Officer Ernest
3 Area Support Group
CFB Gagetown
Jan. 22-24/02

 

Weldon, The Honorable Curt
Chair, Subcommittee on Military
Procurement (Republican – Pennsylvania)
U.S. House Armed Services Committee
Feb. 06/02

Whitburn, Lieutenant Colonel Tom
Squadron 435
17 Wing Winnipeg
Nov. 18-22/01

Woodburn, Commander William
Commander, Submarine Division
Maritime Forces Atlantic
Jan. 22-24/02 

Zoom, 
Detector dog
Canada Customs and Revenue Agency
Nov. 18-22/01


APPENDIX IV

ORGANIZATIONS APPEARING BEFORE THE COMMITTEE

12 Wing Shearwater
17 Wing Winnipeg
Air Canada
Canada Customs & Revenue Agency
Canadian Embassy (Washington)
Canadian NORAD Region Headquarters
Canadian Security & Intelligence Service
CFB Gagetown
Citizenship & Immigration Canada
Conference of Defence Associations
Customs Excise Union Douanes Accise (CEUDA)
Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
Department of Justice
Department of National Defence
Federation of Military & United Services Institutes of Canada
Halifax Port Authority
Halifax Regional Police Force
KPMG Investigation & Security Inc.
Land Forces Atlantic Area
Maritime Air Force Command Pacific
Maritime Forces Atlantic
Maritime Forces Pacific
Montreal Airports
Montreal Urban Community Police Department
National Security Studies, Council on Foreign Relations
Office of the Auditor General of Canada
Office of the U.S. Secretary of Defence
One Canadian Air Division
Organized Crime Agency of British Columbia
Organized Crime Task Force – Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Privy Council Office
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Richmond City Detachment
School of Policy Studies, Queen’s University
Solicitor General Canada 
Sûreté du Québec
The Black Watch, Royal Highland Regiment of Canada
The Brookings Institution
The Carnagie Foundation
The Pentagon
Transport Canada
Trinity College
University of Toronto
U.S. Department of State
U.S. House Armed Services Committee
U.S. House Judiciary Committee
U.S. House Select Committee on Intelligence
U.S. National Security Council
U.S. Office of Homeland Security
U.S. Secretary of defence
U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee
U.S Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)
Vancouver International Airport
Vancouver International Airport Authority
Vancouver Police Department
Vancouver Port Authority
Veterans Affairs Canada


APPENDIX V

STATISTICS ON COMMITTEE ACTIVITIES

# of Persons Whom The Committee Met

# of Organizations Appearing Before Committee

# of Hours

204

57

173.5


APPENDIX VI

LIST OF EXHIBITS

Exhibit #1:             Conference of Defence Associations
                    (November 26, 2001, Issue no. 7)

Exhibit #2:             Royal Canadian Military Institute
                             (November 26, 2001, Issue no. 7)

Exhibit #3:             Council for Canadian Defence & Security in the 21st Century at the Centre for Military & Strategic Studies (November 26, 2001, Issue no. 7)

Exhibit #4:             Library of Parliament – Subject matter of Bill C-36
                    (November 26, 2001, Issue no. 7)

Exhibit #5:             Department of National Defence – Maritime Forces Pacific
(December 10, 2001, Issue no. 9)

Exhibit #6:             Port of Vancouver
(December 10, 2001, Issue no. 9)

Exhibit #7:             City of Vancouver Police Department
(December 10, 2001, Issue no. 9)

Exhibit #8:             Transport Canada
(December 10, 2001, Issue no. 9)

Exhibit #9:             Vancouver International Airport

                             (December 10, 2001, Issue no. 9)

Exhibit #10:           Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)
(December 10, 2001, Issue no. 9)

Exhibit #11:           Canada Immigration
(December 10, 2001, Issue no. 9)

Exhibit #12:           Canada Customs
(December 10, 2001, Issue no. 9)

Exhibit #13:           Department of National Defence – One Canadian Air Division
(December 10, 2001, Issue no. 9)

Exhibit #14:           Department of National Defence – 17 Wing Winnipeg
(December 10, 2001, Issue no. 9)

Exhibit #15:           Air Canada
(December 10, 2001, Issue no. 9)

Exhibit #16:           Department of National Defence – CFB Gagetown
(February 11, 2002, Issue No. 12)

Exhibit #17:           Halifax Port Authority
(February 11, 2002, Issue No. 12)

Exhibit #18:           Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)
                                    (February 11, 2002, Issue No. 12)

Exhibit #19:           Veterans Affairs Canada
(February 11, 2002, Issue No. 12)

Exhibit #20:           Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
                                    (February 11, 2002, Issue No. 12)

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